Anthony Frank Coniglio ~ Page 2

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           On October 23 1945, Tony joined the US Navy and went through boot camp at Camp Shoemaker, California.  In November 1945 he was assigned as a Seaman First Class (S1c), to the battleship USS New Jersey (BB - 62).

1 December 1945 Muster Roll

USS New Jersey

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West Side Businessmen's Baseball Team
Rees Street Playground ~ 1948

Back row: Tovie Latona, Ange Butera, Nick Mitri, Tovie Butera, Tovie Asarese, Jim Randazzo, Unknown
Middle row: Louie Catalfo, Unknown
Front row: Jack Giancarlo, Sam Giancarlo, Tony Coniglio

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Frances Knickerbocker  about 1948

Frannie and Tony ~ about 1956

Tony and Frannie with Tony Jr. ~ 1961

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1961

Tony Jr.

Tony Jr. and Uncle Ange Tony Jr. and Tony
   

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Tom and Tony Jr. ~ 1963

Tony Jr. ~ 1970 Tony Jr. and Tom ~ 1974
   

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Tony and Frannie ~ 1977

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Tony ~ 1977

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1978
     
1982
     

 

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Tom and Tommy Jr.

Tommy Jr.
and Tony Jr.

Tony Jr. ~ 2004

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Tony Jr.,Tony, and Tom

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ANTHONY CONIGLIO, VETERAN, AMATEUR PHOTOGRAPHER

Anthony Frank Coniglio died at his son’s home in Lackawana on March 20, 2007 after a long battle with Alzheimer's disease. He was a long-time Cheektowaga resident and usher at Our Lady of Divine Grace Catholic church. One of nine children whose parents emigrated to America from Serradifalco, Sicily, he would have turned 80 in June.

Mr. Coniglio was born on Buffalo‘s East Side, and graduated from Buffalo Technical High School. He was in the US Navy immediately after World War II, serving on the battleship USS New Jersey on its post-war Pacific tour to Japan, at times handling the helm. After leaving the service in 1948, he worked at the old Delavan Avenue Chevrolet plant for 39 years. Two of his brothers also had long careers at Chevrolet, and all three of his sisters worked there during World War II, in the defense industry. He and all five of his brothers also each served in the US military, three of them during WWII and one during the Korean conflict. His wife, the former Frances Knickerbocker, died in 1978.

One of over a hundred descendants of his parents, Anthony Coniglio was the “unofficial” photographer at the annual Coniglio Family Reunion. He also enjoyed traveling and hiking in numerous national parks, including Glacier National Park He once made a vacation trip by auto, exclusively on US Route 62 (Bailey Avenue) which runs from Niagara Falls, New York on the Canadian border to El Paso, Texas on the Mexican border.

Mr. Coniglio is survived by his sons Anthony F. Jr., and Thomas H., his grandson Thomas Anthony Coniglio, his brothers Raymond A., and Angelo F.; and sisters Concetta Miller and Mary Sowa. He was pre-deceased by his brothers Gaetano V., Leonard and Felice S., and his sister Carmela Volo.


 

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Eulogy for Tony


Coming from such a big family, I always had a hard time explaining, to my friends, my relationship with my brother Tony. I’d call him “my youngest brother”, and they’d say, “but he’s nine years older than you!”

But my brothers Guy, Leonard, Ray, and Phil were grown men when I first knew them, and Millie, Connie and Mary were young ladies.  To me, they were more like parents, and even more so when our father died so young.

But Tony was a teen, and he was the closest to me, in age.  He did things that I wished I could do: he was in high school, he joined the Navy, he sailed the world, he even “bought a car!”; and he married a girl who looked like a movie star.  He was my idol, and he was my brother in a way that the older ones weren’t. Not that they didn’t all, brother or sister, spoil me and give me anything I ever asked for, all my life, to this day.

The other day, Tommy told me that my brother Tony once said he was envious of me, because, for nine years, HE was the special “baby of the family”, and then I came along, and his status changed. If he was envious, though, it never showed, because he was as generous and as good to me as all the rest were.

As I remember him now, I realize that I wasn’t “special.”, because Tony was kind, generous and cheerful with everyone he ever knew!  I was just lucky enough to be his brother.

We’ll miss him, just as he has missed his beloved Frannie for almost thirty years.  I already miss his stories of his travels: breaking his leg in the wilderness, and videotaping and narrating it while he was lost, and then as he was being rescued.  I’ll miss his taking photos at the family picnics, even if he had to take fifteen shots of every pose, “to get it right”. His philosophy on travel photography was: “If I take enough shots, some will be spectacular.” And they were.  I’ll miss arguing with him about such things as whether our parents came from the town of “Serradifarcu”, as I would say, or, as he would put it, from “Serra - di - falco”.

For the past few weeks, you may have noticed at sunset that there was a very bright star in the west. It wasn’t actually a star, it was Venus, a planet.  The ancient Greeks coined the word “planet”, and it means “wanderer”.   To the American Lakotan Indians, that planet represented wisdom, and the last stages of life.

Other cultures had different names for this particular planet. The Hindus call him Shukra, which is Sanskrit for “brightness or clearness”.  The Masai people of Africa call the wanderer Kil-e-ken. He visits the Earth in the form of a boy, who eventually vanishes in a bright light and returns to the heavens.

When Aunt Angie and I left Tommy’s house after saying goodbye to my brother Tony, the sky was clear and dark blue. Venus wasn’t alone in the sky: below it was a crescent moon, with its ends pointing upward, as if welcoming the star.

The ancients referred to this apparition as “Venus in the arms of the moon”, but I know what it really was:

The star was Tony, wandering no more, and the moon was Frannie; and Tony was returning to her arms again, forever.
 

 

"Me, myself and I" ~ Every year on his birthday, Tony took "a" photo of himself.

 

       Tony's approach to photography was: 'If I take enough pictures, some will turn out.'  He not only took enough, some of them didn't just 'turn out', they were spectacular.

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.To Tony's Page 1

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Generations:

Genesis

1

2 3 4

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Gaetano & Rosina

1
Guy

2
Len

3
Ray

4
Phil

5
Millie

6
Connie

7
Mary

8
Tony

9
Ange

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